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Northwest District Beekeepers Association

Regularly scheduled meetings are on the second Tuesday of each month at 7 p.m.
Meetings are held at 1305 Pine Avenue in Snohomish in the Christ the King Lutheran Church building.
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Club Officers:

President: Email
Jeff Thompson

Vice President: Email
Mike Miller

Treasurer: Email
Elisabeth Douglas

Secretary: Email
David Whitlock

Newsletter Editor: Email
Christa Miller

Board Members:
#1 Larry Brainard
#2 Mike Miller
#3 Mark Salser

SWARM CALL LIST

  • Honey Bee swarms do not stay long in one place. Call for their removal as soon as you find them, which is the best way to insure their safe removal. Scroll down for a list of folks who will be happy to help you.
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  • Bees that have already settled into a nest will be harder to remove; if they have moved into a wall or floor of a house, removal can get expensive.
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  • If you have bees in a building, have them removed as soon as possible, to avoid damage that can occur from honey dripping and soaking into surrounding wood.
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  • Do not spray to kill honey bees — it is illegal to exterminate these beneficial pollinators in the state of Washington. In addition, spraying will not remove the nest, and the chance of damage will remain.
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  • See descriptions below to determine whether you have honey bees or some other insect.
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CALL US (see contact info below) IF THIS IS WHAT YOU THINK YOU HAVE:

Photo of Honey Bee

Photo of Honey Bee swarm on a fence
  • The Honey Bee (Apis mellifera) is a stinging insect common to the entire United States and is found in large colonies made up of 30,000 to 80,000 individual bees.
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  • The nest is made of wax but is typically not visible. Usually, you will only see members of the colony coming and going from a small hole either in a hollow tree trunk or an external house wall.
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  • The bottom photo in the column at left is of a swarm of Honey Bees, which has settled temporarily on a fence, while scout bees are looking for a new home where the swarm can build a nest. Swarms are usually docile, since they have no home to protect.
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  • Honey bees are usually larger than Yellow Jackets, are hairy (primarily on their middle body segment), and exhibit a muted gold coloration contrasting with black.
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  • If you are stung by a Honey Bee, the stinger is usually left in your skin since the stinger is barbed. This means that the honey bee dies after stinging only once, since her abdomen is pulled apart when she tries to fly away.
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  • Like most stinging insects, Honey Bees are beneficial to our ecosystem. Honey Bees can be removed humanely from houses and other nesting sites by carefully removing the entire nest (bees, wax, honey, and brood).


Do you have a bee swarm you need help with? Please contact one of these folks right away:


Location of Swarm Contact
Arlington
  • Tom Janes (425)418-1011
  • Jim & Mary Oosterilof (425)346-3132
Bothell
  • David Whitlock (206)412-1798
  • Dave Grimes (425)750-9922
  • Joe Canfield (360)509-6567
Brier
  • Larry Brainard (425)478-0575
Edmonds
  • Jeff Thompson (425)319-7258
  • Larry Brainard (425)478-0575
Everett
  • Skip & Helen Crozier (360)668-8023
  • David Oberstadt (425)908-0800
Granite Falls
  • Dave Pearson (425)583-8139
  • Keith Amberson (425)350-3744
Gold Bar
  • Fred Peers (425)232-5015
Lynnwood
  • Larry Brainard (425)478-0575
  • Jeff Thompson (425)319-7258
Lake Stevens
  • Keith Amberson (425)350-3744
  • David Oberstadt (425)908-0800
  • Dave Pearson (425)583-8139
Lake Forest Park
  • Pete Wolcott (206)367-4853
Marysville
  • Teresa Jorgenson (425)737-0240
  • Jim & Mary Oosterilof (425)346-3132
Mill Creek
  • Jeff Thompson (425)319-7258
Mountlake Terrace
  • Larry Brainard (425)478-0575
Monroe
  • Mike Kossian (425)367-1277
  • Fred Peers (425)232-5015
  • Stan Pallo (360)793.1533
  • Shannon Boling (425)345-7456
Mulkilteo
  • Jeff Thompson (425)319-7258
Shoreline
  • Pete Wolcott (206)367-4853
  • Larry Brainard (425)478-0575
Smokey Point
  • Jim & Mary Oosterilof (425)346-3132
Snohomish
  • Dave Pearson (425)583-8139
  • David Oberstadt (425)908-0800
  • Shannon Boling (425)345-7456
  • Tim Ade (425)239-9959
Stanwood
  • Stan Pallo (360)793-1533
  • Tom Janes (425)428-1011
  • Jim & Mary Oosterilof (425)346-3132
Sultan
  • Shannon Boling (425)345-7456
  • Fred Peers (425)232-5015
  • Stan Pallo (360)793.1533
  • Mike Kossian (425)367-1277
Woodinville
  • Dan Chrisinger (206)406-1075
  • Dave Grimes (425)750-9922
  • Fred Peers (425)232-5015
  • Dave Whitlock (206)412-1798


ALL OF THE FOLLOWING SHOULD BE REMOVED BY A PROFESSIONAL EXTERMINATOR:


Photo of Yellow Jacket
  • The Yellow Jacket (Vespula vulgera) is a stinging insect common to the Eastern United States and is found in medium-sized colonies of a couple hundred to a few thousand.
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  • The nest is made of paper but is typically not visible. Usually, you will only see members of the colony coming and going from a small hole either in the ground or an external house wall.
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  • The colony members are small and smooth (not hairy), with sharply contrasting yellow and black colors.
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  • If you are stung by a Yellow Jacket, the stinger is not left in your skin since the stinger is not barbed. This means that, unlike Honey Bees, Yellow Jackets can sting you repeatedly.
Photo of Bald Faced Hornet
  • The Bald Faced Hornet (Dolichovespula maculata) is a stinging insect common to the United States and is found in medium-sized colonies of a couple hundred to a few thousand.
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  • The nest is made of paper and is typically visible (see nest picture below), often found hanging from a tree branch (usually 10-20 feet above the ground).
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  • The colony members are larger than Honey Bees, do not have body hair, and exhibit coloration of a yellowish/white with contrasting black.
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  • If you are stung by a Hornet, the stinger is not left in your skin since the stinger is not barbed. These colonies can be very defensive! While they usually keep to themselves, do not attempt to contact or handle a nest.
Photo of Bald Faced Hornet nest
  • The Bald Faced Hornet’s nest can be as small as a football and as large as 3-4 feet long.
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  • Do not attempt to contact or handle a nest. Hornets will vigorously defend their nest if you come in contact with it or are perceived as a threat.
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  • Not all nests are found hanging from tree branches. Sometimes, nests can be found attached to the underside of external stair units, on the sides of buildings, and under porches.
Photo of Wasps on a nest
  • While there are many Wasp species that nest in a variety of different configurations, the photo shows the most typical nest construction of a paper wasp.
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  • These stinging insects are usually found walking upon small (3-4 inch) nests. These nests, however can be quite large (5-12 inches in diameter).
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  • The nest is made of paper material and is usually located outside a human residence (under the eaves) attached to a facia or soffit. These nests are also commonly found up and inside attic and bathroom vents.
Photo of Bumble Bee
  • The Bumble Bee (Genus: Bombus) is a stinging insect common to the United States and is found in small colonies of a couple hundred.
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  • The nest is made of fibrous material (such as an abandoned mouse nest or bird’s nest), with small wax pots nested within the fiber. The nest is not typically visible. Usually, you will only see members of the colony coming and going from a small hole in the ground. Bumble Bee nests are also common within wood piles, under overturned pots, and within other yard debris.
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  • The colony members are large, very hairy, and have sharply contrasting yellow/gold and black colors.
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  • If you are stung by a Bumble Bee, the stinger is not left in your skin since the stinger is not barbed.
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  • Usually, Bumble Bee nests can be humanely removed and moved to a less problematic location.